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Photographer Glenn Jowitt talks to curator Athol McCredie about some of his photos in the Te Papa collection


<P>Photographer Glenn Jowitt (1955&#8211;2014) is best known for his images of Pacific people and their cultures, both in New Zealand and in the Pacific Islands. In this conversation, recorded in 2012, he talks to Athol McCredie, Te Papa’s curator of photography, about some of his photographs in the collection.</P> <P data-associrn="35736"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: This was a very special place because I lived on Lincoln Street, and the woman that owned this house was a Cook Island woman, from the island of Atiu, called Mary Tiva. She used to go to the dairy, and sometimes I’d go to the dairy, and we’d talk. She always had a beautiful, long, grey pigtail plaited down the back of her head and a shell clasp. I used to say, ‘I’d like to come and visit you one day.’ She’d say, ‘Why would you want to do that?’ And I’d say, ‘I’m just interested in taking pictures of the Cook Island culture.’</P> <P>After a couple of months, I decided I’d go and see Mary because by this time I’d met Mary and talked to her. So I took some food round to Mary’s place, which was five houses away, and I said, ‘Can I come in?’ She was quite bemused and amused by it. </P> <P>But I got in there, and we had a cup of tea and I gave her the food I’d brought for her. I had a look around and I found this room where she had the most recent style of Cook Island hats, made of raffia, laid out on this bed. For me, it was just one of those little moments. It was so beautiful, everything was perfect. So I took the picture and I took some other pictures of Mary in her lounge, which didn’t have the strength of this, of all the interiors. </P> <P>When we went to launch the exhibition at the Auckland City Art Gallery I made sure &#8211; because it was a very big deal for me to have arrived at this point &#8211; I made sure that Mary got an invitation to the opening. But she rang up and said, ‘I’m not going to come, because it’s for big people.’ And I thought, ‘Oh. OK.’ So what I did later was I picked her and her sister up and took them to the Auckland City Art Gallery to look at the exhibition. She looked at this picture and she gave me a big whack on the back and said, ‘Why you do that?’ I said, ‘Oh, well, because it’s beautiful, Mary.’ She said, ‘Why have you got my hats in here?’ And it was just one of those beautiful moments. The older Cook Island mamas, when they feel that you’re being good or they love you, they will give you a whack on the back. It will really surprise you. That’s the story about that picture. </P> <P>It’s a spare room, and she just laid out the hats on the bed. Probably on Sunday she’d go and pick the one she wanted to wear. </P> <P>And, in time, she gave me a hat, and I went back and stayed with her cousins and sisters on Atiu.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="39936"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: Obviously with the Pacific Island cultures &#8211; talking to elders, talking to men &#8211; fishing was a really big part of what they did in their homelands. I met a gentleman &#8211; not this gentleman in the photograph &#8211; who worked at Jaybel Fisheries on the [Auckland] waterfront. I don’t think they exist now, they’ve probably been taken up by some conglomerate.</P> <P>I went in to the fish factory and it was kind of scary. For me, it was kind of sad that these people had come from such a beautiful place and were working in what seemed to me like a very damp, smelly, wet, fishy place their whole lives. And this gentleman in his gesture of pouring out the fish expressed that, I guess, dislocation from where he’d come from: from a beautiful place to a factory. And obviously, once I got to the islands I was going to be photographing fishing, so this was kind of a lead in.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="42336"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: This was a Cook Island or Niue haircutting ceremony. Mary Tiva took me to this. It was very interesting. I had an idea what it was about but I’d never witnessed it. So, when I went into that hall and was given a seat at the big table, I was so amazed by the beauty and the colour of the whole thing and how the community got together, the family got together, and practised <EM>this thing</EM> that was food exchanges, money exchanges ... So much work had gone into this boy’s initiation into manhood. </P> <P>In latter years, I realised that this process was practised mainly in the Cook Islands but in Niue as well. The haircutting ceremony meant that if a raiding village took over your village, it was culturally not correct for marauding warriors to kill women and children. So, what the families would do, to protect their gene pool, their community, was they wouldn’t cut their boys’ hair until they’d really entered puberty. Then they’d have a haircutting ceremony, and it would be an announcement that they were a man.</P> <P>In our culture, it took on other guises, but in the traditional culture it was a way of protecting their community from being wiped out by the next village or the next island. Because when the warriors came in to kill the men, they couldn’t discern between the young boys and the young girls, so they wouldn’t kill them. So, it might be 14, 15-year-old young boys that escape, and then two or three years later they can start providing a new generation of people.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="44798"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: I became very aware very early on with photographing the Pacific Island communities in Auckland (I started with the people on my street, like Mary Tiva and the Tokelauans across the road, and then the Tongans up the road, and round on Summer Street the Niueans, and the Samoan community from the street I live on now) that these people &#8211; the older people, not my generation &#8211; had actually come to New Zealand and spent a lot of time working in factories as a way of promoting education and a better life for their children. </P> <P>So it’s quite upsetting. I ended up at Allied Industries, where the workers were weaving wires into looms for cars, and I just thought, there’s kind of a tragic irony that it had come to this, that people who were experts at weaving were now weaving wiring looms in cars. So, this picture was sort of evidence of the work that they’d done, and how in the oddest of ways their cultural practice had sort of carried through into a factory. And so, they were particularly <EM>good</EM> at this.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="40966"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: One of the things I was very interested in was the transport thing. And the commitment that these communities had made to Auckland and working in factories. This was just a kind of a funny moment where it seemed like I could be anywhere. People were turbaned up or wearing almost burqas in this factory, and you started playing up and using the grease gun like a Che Guevara look. So I took this picture, which became a bit of humour in a situation that I found pretty sad.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="41544"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: What’s interesting about this picture is that the adze that the gentleman’s using is a sharpened car spring. So there’s the link: the car spring &#8211; Mazda Motors. Pretty obscure, but there’s the link. </P> <P>The other significant thing about this person was he was a very important storyteller. As a young boy of five years old, six years old, he survived one of the last raids of blackbirders to take Tokelauan men to Chile to work in the plantations. When he was a little boy, these people turned up to take people away, and his family hid him under mats in the fale. And he survived it. So he was a real link with the past. He was just sitting casually under a coconut tree carving fishing boxes.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="37547"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: This was at the Pacific Island M&#257;ori dance festival. I was at the entranceway and I saw this gentleman walk in with his Afro. Then I saw the ‘London. Paris. New York. Otara.’, which did make me laugh. I wanted to take a picture of him that kind of had some humour in it, because I liked the fact that Otara was now counted as the Paris of New Zealand. And I saw the cabbage tree, so I put the two together. We both had a good laugh about what I was up to, because he was very aware that I was sort of drawing a parallel between his Afro and the cabbage tree. Very funny. It’s sort of a salty, dark picture but it had that humour intact.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="41427"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: When I first started doing the Pacific Island project, I went to see Reverend Sio at the Pacific Island church in Edinburgh Street [Auckland]. He was the boss. He was the person who started the Pacific Island church for the Presbyterian congregations in Auckland. </P> <P>So I went to see Reverend Sio, and he said, ‘We’re not sure about these photographers. We’ve had a few. But,’ he said, ‘come to a meeting and meet the other ten ministers.’ So I sat down with them, had a cup of tea, and talked to them about what I was doing, and what did they think about the idea of assisting me in access of aspects of the five different communities: cultural, life, religious practice? And they said ‘Look, you’ll have to go away, we need to talk about it.’ A month later, I came back, sat down, and they grilled me a bit &#8211; and they said, ‘No, we’re prepared to let you have access and we’ll help you with anything you want.’ It was a huge thing.</P> <P>This photograph was a choir fundraising in a church in Mangare. I became very aware that the association between money and God was an incredibly big thing. If you were able to give money it was a gift that you were making to God and it was the best thing to do.</P> <P>And this woman &#8211; you know I’m sitting right by the minister who was collecting the money, almost over his shoulder with a 35mm lens on, taking pictures, and I tried to do it as quickly as possible, but &#8211; I just loved her pious look. Her kind of ‘here I am’.</P> <P><STRONG>Athol</STRONG>: You must have been very obvious to the rest of the congregation.</P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: Yeah, I was. What I would do if I was going to photograph a church service, particularly church services, or if I was in a mosque, before I even started taking pictures I would have the minister or the sheikh, or whoever it is that’s in charge if it’s their service, I would have them let on to people that Glenn’s here to take pictures and please try and ignore him, and I would know that I didn’t pass between the minister and the congregation. If I wanted to go over here I’d have to go right round the back. So little things I knew. And the introductions and the access was very important because it meant that if someone had something to say about it they could say it then, because it was open. If you don’t want it, tell us. And they’d go, ‘Oh, OK.’</P> <P>And I wasn’t making any promises of giving everyone a picture, I couldn’t do that. But one thing I did do with this body of work was I went back to the PIC [Pacific Island Church] and I did slide shows for Sunday schools, for a while, talking to children.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="1227597"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: I shot this while I was doing the ‘Polynesia Here and There’ [series] material. Lucy Parkinson was a very good friend of mine, and at this time in our lives I was going up to Ocean Beach and staying with them. When we swam at the sea we didn’t wear anything. There was about half a dozen, a dozen of us at one time, and it was just the way we were. </P> <P>Lucy was wandering around the beach with Hinekoia on her hip and this little white cloud popped up. I thought, ‘God.’ It was the only cloud in the sky. And I said, ‘Lucy, we’ve got to use this.’ She has her family’s pounamu, and she’s pregnant to her second child.</P> <P>Lucy’s a very staunch woman, you know, really knows where she stands with her culture and with the world. This just represented her strength, and her family’s strength. It was just one of those moments where I took it, didn’t really think about it, because I didn’t see the nudity as anything different than normal life at the beach with a kind of hippie attitude.</P> <P>It wasn’t until later that I realised that the cloud and the pounamu and Hinekoia and the hot sea and the hot wave made for this picture that just expressed, for me, the strength of the kuia, the M&#257;ori woman, in our culture, and how incredible it is that they’ve carried the culture through the terrible times of colonialism. When alcohol was the way, and their whole culture was busted up &#8211; it was the M&#257;ori women in New Zealand, I believe, and in the Pacific particularly, where they preserved their culture through their cultural practice. <BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="38340"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: I was staying with the Ropati family, Ropati V’ai, who were quite a significant family in S&#257;moan politics. This was the second-most northern beach on Savai‘i, and there’d been a lot of rain and quite a lot of storms, and then everyone was really pleased the fishermen were going out that night &#8211; because the sea had come down a bit &#8211; and they could get some fish. </P> <P>I didn’t go out with the fisherman, but what I did, with my underwater camera, was I went out to the back swell and photographed the vaka coming over the reef. I did quite a lot of that. And it was quite spectacular because you’re bobbing up and down with a snorkel and an underwater camera as they come over. Quite incredible. So, you’re bobbing round a bit. It’s a bit of an effort, taking pictures &#8211; you have to blow the water off the lens. And then I came in on to the land when they were landing it, kicked the flippers off, blew the water off the lens, and took this picture.</P> <P>I overlooked it at the time, because I took quite a lot of pictures. I didn’t think, ‘Oh, I’d got a great picture there.’ I was at Real Pictures, getting the contact sheets back, because it was all shot on neg, and Mark Adams walked in, and we were looking at them, and he said, ‘God, this is a beauty.’ And I said, ‘You’re right.’ Mark was the first person to actually go, ‘Ah, you’ve got something there.’ And I have. The double horizon lines, the family, the fact that they’ve got some bonito and they’re going to be eating nice fish for days just expressed the whole community. It’s sort of got a church thing about it. And then the whole fanau [family] doing it, the boys, and the glee in coming out with the catch.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="42011"></P> <P><STRONG>Glenn</STRONG>: This was a wedding ceremony, where they present t&#299;vaevae [quilts]. I was very interested in this whole tivaevae thing and these gifts that were made by whole families six months prior to the wedding. What I found very cute about it was they started with the moenga, the sleeping mats, and they draped them over their knees, and then they fired a lot of pillows at them, then they put the t&#299;vaevae over their knees, so it looks like they’re actually in bed. </P> <P>The t&#299;vaevae are a very special form of their culture, but it’s interesting to know how come the Cook Islands have got this Western way of creating something that’s so Cook Island is because in the early days when the Presbyterians arrived in Rarotonga, they found the making of tapa [bark cloth] very noisy. The bang, bang, bang. They didn’t like the tapping six days a week. So they banned the making of tapa in the Cook Islands and introduced the making of bedspreads instead. It's interesting, you have the same practice in Tahiti, but nowhere else. And so the poor Cook Island people lost their tapa-making practice. It’s starting to come back, a rebirth. But it’s not like Tonga, where if you go and stay in a village in Tonga, you’ve got to accept that there’s going to be the tapping of tapa, ngatu as they call it, from 7 o’clock till dark, every day except Sunday. It’s just part of it. <BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="39935"></P> <P>Obviously, in New Zealand I heard about the haircutting ceremonies etcetera, and obviously I enquired about ‘Is there something for the girls?’ And they said, ‘Yes, we have the ear-piercing ceremony.’ And it’s only really practised in Niue. So when I got to Niue the first thing I was looking for was an ear-piercing ceremony, which I found, and this picture was at the food division after the ear-piercing ceremony.</P> <P>I just love the chap with the Afro. He’s running around dividing fish. This elder’s saying, ‘This fish goes on this pile, in accordance with the amount of money these people have given.’ And I just enjoyed this &#8211; he had a spring in his step, and it was very amusing. I managed to take this picture, which kind of summed up the whole division of food. Plus they had the element of humour with the tuna tail duplicating the leaves of the coconut palm, and all the stuff laid out. And then, in the middle of it, mirror glasses and an Afro. When Louise and I were in Niue and we met this chap we’d always called Jimi Hendrix, which he seemed to like. <BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="40365"></P> <P>This is a very, very special friend of ours. When Louise and I arrived in Tonga, they’d had a huge hurricane. Cyclone Isaacs had just gone from north to south on the country. Then unfortunately it’d turned around and gone from south to north, straight all over it again. So it was a hundred-year storm. We did question about going to Tonga because there’d be no food and we were a burden on people. But I made my approaches through the church and we’d always planned to go to Vava'u, so we got this sinking boat all the way to Vava'u.</P> <P>And we were hosted by this gentleman on the left called Hehepoto. That’s the name he went by. He was the chief, the head minister of the Free Wesleyan Church of Tonga, in the Neiafu group. So, we stayed with him, and he had all the ministers come from all the different congregations to talk about how to cope with the hurricane. He was such a kind man, he just took us on like we were his kids. And this was just a little moment in the afternoon &#8211; you know, he wasn’t exactly a light man, so lying down in the heat of the day was a beautiful thing &#8211; and I just went past his bedroom when I saw him there and I said, ‘Can I take this picture?’ And he gave me a big smile and there you have it. He’s not with us anymore.</P> <P>There’s one little story that I will tell, that I think is really very funny, about me and Hehepoto. Embarrassingly so, often when I went to these places I would get the treatment like I was some kind of king or something. Very embarrassing. Anyway, to cut a long story short, one day I sat down to breakfast with Hehepoto to talk about things, and the mamas had laid out this beautiful little table in the middle of a hall, all by itself, with knives and forks. Now all the taro had been wiped out, all the coconuts were gone, all the bananas were gone, so there’s not much left to eat. Boiled eggs and taro was about it. Anyway we sat down, and we both had a whole taro each and a big teapot full of weak tea. And I looked at this and I thought, ‘Hmm, the only way to deal with this was to cut it up.’ So I cut slices up. And I always have Vegemite when I’m travelling, so &#8211; this is my trick with the taro if it got a bit boring &#8211; I cut it and put Vegemite on it, and it was great. So I sat down and I did this, and Hehepoto looked at me and he said ‘What’s that?’ So I said ‘It’s Vegemite, it’s great. You put it on and it lifts the taro a bit, so it’s not so boring.’ He goes, ‘Oh, I’d like to try that.’ So I buttered him a slice with not too much Vegemite on it, cut it in half, and gave it to him in two pieces, like a real bit of bread. And he picked it up and he took one bite, and his face went a bit solemn, and he looked at me and he said, ‘That is the first time &#8211; and the last time.’ [laughs] And I said, ‘Oh, OK, the first time and the last time. Well, don’t worry, you don’t have to eat it.’ He said, ‘No, I’ll finish it.’ [laughs] But anyway, that was his &#8211; the first time and the last time. It was very funny, I loved him for it. <BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="36629"></P> <P>I was on my way to Atiu for a haircutting ceremony. I’d come from Rarotonga, and Louise and I had decided to have a break, so I was on my own. I got this little boat, ocean trader, going round the islands. And this was the day we stopped at Mauke, unloading supplies, which was the second-to-last stop. We went to Mitiaro and Manaia, then Mauke, and then Atiu, where I was getting off. </P> <P>It was a very unpleasant ship, sleeping on the deck, terrible. Little kids being sick and no washing facilities, it was really horrible. Anyway, they were basically loading the boat up and then surfing it in, up to the reef. This channel had been made by the Americans during the Second World War. So they’d surf in, and then kids would go down, and they’d take the goods out of the boat very quickly, so it wouldn’t get wet. I chose a spot up a cliff &#8211; there was a bit of a cliff here &#8211; just to get an aerial view of it. It’s always been, for me, a beautiful image because of the lines. There’s all these lines and this action, and [the boy] in the bottom right-hand corner, he just waved his arms for me at the right moment. When you look at the print, the oars are shiny.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="39390"></P> <P>This is the brass band from the King’s Church in Nuku‘alofa returning home. I just found the big sousaphone &#8211; tuba, whatever you call it &#8211; kind of amusing. I love the King of Tonga and his brass band. It’s something else. They’ve adopted the brass band thing like no one else really has in the Pacific, and they play Dixieland jazz with banjos, and then they’re playing New Orleans parade music, and then hymns. It’s just very intriguing, the back view. There was a point where I was challenged about the back view of this picture, because they said, ‘It’s not polite to photograph people’s back views.’ And I thought, ‘Hmm, OK.’ I wasn’t quite sure where they were coming from, but I felt that the sousaphone made it &#8211; gave it some humour &#8211; and it was like cultures mishmashing. They’re all dressed in white.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="42952"></P> <P>This was the conferring of a fine chief, which is quite ... When you get to S&#257;moa and say you’re going to [photograph] this, they say you’re not allowed. But, if you have some contacts, and someone within that extended family is having it, you might be allowed to. So, I was very lucky to photograph this particular ceremony. </P> <P>It was a beautiful thing. I always document a cultural activity from beginning to end, so I was able to photograph the food preparation, the bringing of the food, the preparation of [the new chief], the actual ‘ava ceremony they hold during the festival, during ceremony, the prayer, the religious activities, and then outside for the presentation of foodstuffs and fine mats. </P> <P>So it was a fantastic day. It was very hot in there. I managed to take the pictures without disturbing anybody by being in front of them or crossing the room. Much of what I do, I take note of what my church would say. Christian cultures in New Zealand would say, once the ceremony starts you never walk between the congregation and the minister. In the same case as this, there are only so many positions you can be. I took the shot before the practice occurred, because I was aware I would not be able to take pictures during the cultural practice, and so this is a casual portrait before the ceremony was started.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="36157"></P> <P>This is a grave, decorated in cordial bottles. I just found an irony in it, because in Tonga, at that time, they used our regular beer bottles for cordial and very little beer was sold in them, but it just seemed very amazing &#8211; from my point of view and my culture &#8211; that you would decorate a grave with beer bottles without sort of implying that there was something up with this guy and that’s why he’s there &#8211; or she. </P> <P>But the whole attitude towards graves in Tonga and S&#257;moa is quite bemusing, because they’ll go down on a Sunday, sit all over them, and clean them. Whereas in M&#257;ori culture, you’d never sit on a grave. So, it’s poignant that someone, a person that people love, ended up in that grave.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="41426"></P> <P>This is Mary Tiva’s family. I went back to Atiu, and I went to a church service with cousins and sisters of Mary Tiva &#8211; the woman that first left me take [the photo of] the bed of hats. </P> <P>This is just an off-the-cuff image. Doing this work, it’s been very tricky to make pictures that are real without affecting things too much. And in a funny kind of way, I’ve affected this, in that she’s smiling &#8211; she’s amused that I’m there. But she’s not looking at me, which is what made it work.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="43434"></P> <P>While working in the Pacific in 1981&#8211;82, I always tried to cover everything. I went to the primary school, and it was very nice, because they were teaching young women how to make housing flax from a coconut frond. So I spent a bit of time at the school, and I came out, and the children were doing this. I was very much taken by the fact that the school was painted this blue, so when you first look at it you think it’s a sea, when it’s not. </P> <P>To arrive at this image I took a whole roll. I was looking for the movement of the frond and positioning of the fingers &#8211; so perhaps you look at it and you could know how make this mat.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="39459"></P> <P>I love this table, because this gentleman &#8211; he was an older chap, and he was easily the best fisherman in Avatele at the time. He would always get fish. He would sell the fish. And he would buy his gin and his brandy, and his corned beef and his white bread and his cigarettes. This was how his table was just laid out. I was invited to his house, and I had a look at it, and I thought, ‘That’s all a man needs.’ He’s got his motorcycle manual, teapot, brandy, bread, cigarettes, and a comb &#8211; to keep it tidy.&nbsp; Plus the ashtray. He was a very beautiful man, so welcoming, and he was fishing every day. </P> <P>One time when I was in Avatele, my host lent me a beautiful little vaka, and I used to paddle out amongst the fishermen and photograph them fishing. It was just a small thing, and because I’d owned kayaks as a kid I felt quite able to go miles out to sea on this thing and keep my head together and not turn it over. One day, I was out there at sunset, and he was the only person out there, fishing away. I paddled over to him, and while I was paddling over to him, he took a swig on a coconut. And I thought, ‘Ah, that’s what I feel like.’ I went alongside him, thinking he’s probably got a few in the side of the boat, and he might - you know, I thought I wouldn’t mind some myself. So I went over, and I intimated that perhaps I could have a swig on the coconut, because I was a bit dry on it. And he was a wee bit hesitant. But then he gave me a smile, and he passed me the coconut, and I took and swig of it &#8211; and it was gin! [laughs] He was cutting the gin with the coconut! And I realised why he was not in a big hurry to hand it over to me.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="645547"></P> <P>I was invited to help out a friend of mine called Sam Ford and the Veranda Band, to do some performance photographs for their new album cover. Sam Ford has a link with the Cook Island community; he was part Cook Island. He invited a group of Atiuan dancers to do the warm-up act. I was astounded, because I’d been in the green room of the Glue Pot &#8211; the Glue Pot was a famous, notorious place where bands played from the late ‘70s &#8211; and I went backstage, and these girls were changing. Obviously I didn’t just bowl in, I asked them, ‘Can I come through and have a look?’ They said, ‘Yes, come through.’ So I took these pictures, and I just thought it [showed] their culture surviving in this kind of green room, where the bands had all graffitied the walls, it was just such a juxtaposition. I took it with flash and I took it without flash, and the flash certainly worked the best. <BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="645246"></P> <P>I used to live on Sackville Street, in Grey Lynn, and I had a contact with a guy called John Tonga, who was a serious person with this church. I always used to go and vote in this little church up the road and go and see John &#8211; because John would be overseeing, and I’d get to catch up on what’s new in Tonga. One day, I was in there voting, and John Tonga came over and said, ‘Glenn, Glenn, you must come &#8211; the king is coming.’ And I went, ‘Oh, OK, the king is coming.’ And it turned out they were going to demolish this church, plus another church on the site, and build a new church. </P> <P>So I went back home and thought about it. I thought, ‘Well, I’ll talk to Kennedy Warne at <EM>New Zealand Geographic</EM> about it. Let’s do a story on this new church in Grey Lynn.’ Because it was quite a substantial building they were putting together. So on the first day, I went down there when the king had come to lay the first bit of concrete. The day before, I turned up to talk to people. This was in a chap called Kalifi’s house &#8211; he was the accountant for the church. I got talking to him, and he said, ‘Oh, my wife’s made a beautiful cake of the church.’ I said, ‘Oh, where is it?’ And he said, ‘It’s over in Avondale’. So he and I jumped in the car and went over to his house. This was a to-scale model of the church that they were knocking down, made in fruitcake with marzipan icing! I was just so knocked out to find this thing, it was just so beautiful. Then, of course, later on, I photographed the king giving the new church.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P data-associrn="645242"></P> <P>This was the day after I took the church picture. We’d gone to the site [on] Sackville Street, where my house was, and they’d built marquees, and were having a bit of a party and a fundraiser, and the king was coming to put the first bit of concrete in the hole. They had a party. </P> <P>This is a special portrait for me, because the middle woman was my neighbour across the road for eight years, and so that’s why she’s pleased to see me. It’s a scorching hot day, and she’s wearing this big woolly coat. [laughs] I found it very amusing that, in the middle of summer, these fine women are wearing such big clothing, when it’s so hot.</P> <P>&nbsp;</P>
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Glenn Jowitt, Sataua, Savai'i, Western Samoa, 1982. From the series: Polynesia here and there, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Lincoln St., Ponsonby, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Jaybel Fisheries, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Pacific Islanders' Church, Mangere, Auckland. Hair Cutting Ceremony 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Allied Industries, Mangere, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Mazda Motors, Otahuhu, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Nukunonu, Tokelau 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Otara, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Pacific Islanders' Church, Mangere, Auckland 1981. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Lucy Parkinson on Ocean Beach, Whangarei, 1981, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Gift of the photographer, 1994.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Titikaveka packing shed, Rarotonga, the Cook Islands. Presentation...1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Alofi, Niue. Food division after an Earpiercing Ceremony 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Neiafu, Vava'u, Tonga 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Mauke, the Cook Islands 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Vaha'akolo Road, Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu, Tonga 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Aleipata, Upolu, Western Samoa. Newly bestowed Matai (chief) ... 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Lakepa, Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu, Tonga. Tongan grave 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Catholic Mission Church, Areora, Atiu, Cook Islands, 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Liolau Primary School, Avatele, Niue 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Avatele, Niue, fisherman's Table 1982. From the series: Polynesia Here and There, 1982, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1983 with Lindsay Buick Bequest funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Untitled (Atiuan dancers prepare to perform), 1992, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Cake for King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV (cake represents church demolished to make way for new church, Grey Lynn), 1993, colour photograph, Ilfochrome print,
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz

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Glenn Jowitt, Launch of Vaine Mo'onia (the true vine), new Tongan Methodist Church, Sackville St, Grey Lynn, Auckland, 29 October 1994, colour photograph, Cibachrome print,
Purchased 1999 with New Zealand Lottery Grants Board funds.
Full object info is available on collections.tepapa.govt.nz